4 January

1581 birth of Augustin Guillain

1684 death of Claude Audran

1734 birth of Robert Mylne

1808 birth of John Pennethorne
1894 death of Karl Freiherr von Hasenauer

Campo Marzio/Tafuri 1
1998.01.04     3016 5228

Campo Marzio/Tafuri 2
1998.01.04     3016 dt12/0100

ideas
1999.01.04     3428

sixth architectural reference
2001.01.04     2525a 2909

Re: A Living Archive
2003.01.04 12:46

Re: Bam, Venice
2004.01.04 13:44

Re: WTC planning notes
2004.01.04 17:30

can anyone remember why they chose to become an architect?
2004.01.04 21:11

About to read "Superstudio: Life without objects" and "Architecture Must Burn"
2005.01.04 10:44

Please, someone stop Robert Stern.
2005.01.04 16:08

BobandDenise, etc.
2006.01.04 16:53     kgv06

Ury, now quondam, exactly 200 years ago
2012.01.04 12:51



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Re: A Living Archive
2003.01.04 12:46

20 March is the dedication date of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme, one of the seven churches of Rome, partially of the quondam Sessorian palace of Helena Augusta, a construction project supervised and somewhat designed by Eutropia very soon after Helena's death.



Re: Bam, Venice
2004.01.04 13:44

Ah, a Quondam Bam.

Wonder if any 3D computer models will also be 'built' of the Citadel during the reenactment process. They might make for good fund-raising courtesy items, or maybe virtual places for every-size-fits-no-one immersion.

"The more things change, the more they stay the same."

Go figure [in 3D].

Earthquake, the original culture shock



Re: WTC planning notes
2004.01.04 17:30

virtual american: World Peace Center

real american: I want a piece of the world with me in the center .

can anyone remember why they chose to become an architect?
2004.01.04 21:11





About to read "Superstudio: Life without objects" and "Architecture Must Burn"
2005.01.04 10:44

Superstudio: Life Without Objects is worthwhile. I too knew very little about Superstudio, and the book fixed that.

Architecture Must Burn tries too hard to be "cool" and "with it" -- basically fluff text full of vapid imperatives. At best it's a (very short) period piece.



Please, someone stop Robert Stern.
2005.01.04 16:08

Kahn is currently busy collaboration with St. Catherine de Ricci co-authoring "Reenactionary Bilocating Architecturism"



08010401.db IQ, mirror-copy plans     4719
08010402.db IQ, mirror-copy plans     4720
08010403.db IQ, mirror-copy plans     4721
08010404.db IQ, mirror-copy plans     4722

Bilocation Syndrome
2011.01.04 21:18

It's very strange for Meier to say he was involved with Roma Interrotta when in fact he was not one of the 12 architects involved with Roma Interrotta.

Plus, the Whites vs. Grays 'debate' was a mid-seventies thing. There is even an A+U magazine from 1975 or 1976 with the whole theme of Whites vs. Grays. Not to mention Tafuri's "American Graffiti: Five x Five = Twenty-five" in Oppositions 5 (Summer 1976) -- "Tafuri maintains that, notwithstanding the hermetic polemics of "Grey" versus "White"..."



Ury, now quondam, exactly 200 years ago
2012.01.04 12:51

Miers Fisher (Miers is pronounced Mayer's as in Oscar Mayer's) was a prominent Philadelphia lawyer before and after the American Revolution. Among many, many other things, he collected the rent money for the house that President George Washington lived in when Philadelphia was the US capital. President Washington was even a dinner guest of Miers' at least once. Miers purchased a country estate in the late 1790s, formally retired in 1805 and moved to the estate. He called the house Ury. I now live on what once was the Ury estate/farm. Miers kept a daily journal for all the years of his retirement. In 1818, Miers moved back to Philadelphia and died at his residence on Arch Street on March 14, 1819 at the age of 72. In 1812 Miers turned 65 and on March 20, 2012 I'll be 56.

All of Miers Fisher's journals are now at the Friends Historical Library of Swarthmore College. I've had a photocopy set of the 1812 journal since 2007.

This 1812-2012 project is about the same place in parallel times, something like an experiment in synchronous bilocation, albeit divided by exactly 200 years. A fitting subject, I think, for a virtual museum of architecture.

www.quondam.com/c01/0104.htm

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