working title museum

diptych: architecture and thinking twice

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thinking
...the peeling wall detail of a 1970-4 Venturi and Rauch project is precursor to Gehry's pliancy.


twice
The Architect Came Twice (in foreign tongue)


thinking
Modern Post [and Beam]
[Ph]D Construction
Envelope of the Politics
Mini-Meism
"Brother have you got a dime-a-dozen?"
not want, not waste, thinking wishful
Theory is death backwards


thinking
Everyday, Quondam's front page features museum data specific to whatever day of the year it happens to be. I suggest you visit Quondam that way for a week or so--read all the material, click on all the links, with the hope being that you'll learn something you didn't know before, or find yourself thinking something you haven't thought before, or maybe you'll find some design inspiration even.


twice
For some reason, the Italian edition has more than twice as many plates as the 1980s reprint. Durand should have entitled it Size Matters.


thinking
About a half mile into my exercise walk this morning, I looked up and was surprised to see the path abruptly end in a great mass of foliage. Itís the same path I take everyday, basically walking through the woods along Pennypack creek, but today I was also deep in thought about what I read last night, and instinctively mostly looking down at the path for the occasional debris there since the last rain storm. In a truly uncanny way, immediately upon perceiving the path ending in a great mass of foliage, my mind told me I was suddenly in a whole different place; it was like waking up from a trace or something and finding myself in a whole other place I hadnít been before, but the sensation only lasted that initial second of perception. What happened is a substantial limb of a tree fell, probably yesterday during the heavy winds at dusk, directly down on the path, and luckily you could rather easily work your way around the obstacle. Subsequently, this little episode of deterritorialization changed the focus, so to speak, on what I was already thinking about, namely, Sam Rodell's "The influence of Robert Venturi on Louis Kahn."
Without ever expressly saying so, Rodell's "thesis" boils down to being very much about deterritorialization. There is the whole notion of Venturi influencing Kahn, a not-too-commonly held historical fact, yet a quite deterritorializing proposition if indeed true--it really shouldn't be so hard to believe that the servant space can have a significant influence on the served space as much as...

thinking
... the served space can significantly influence the servant space, however. Yet there is also the notion that the evidence of Venturi's influence on Kahn is more circumstantial than substantial, a simultaneous 'there' and 'not there,' again a quite deterritorialized state of being. It's not like "the jury's still out" though, because there is general agreement that Venturi would have inevitably had an influence on Kahn, but it is not all that easy, except in about three specific cases, to pinpoint exactly what the influences were.


thinking
Denise Scott Brown said, "Well, I know where Lou Kahn got it. He got it from Team Ten. You know, in Europe, there was a lot of thinking about diagonals at that point. Lou had more influence from Team Ten earlier than has been generally recognized. I think I discovered how that happened, too. But thatís another story."


thinking
Scolari does say, however, some nice things about drawing/not drawing Calvino's Invisible Cities. It got me thinking that what I've been doing for more than half of the last 30 years is drawing/not drawing an invisible museum of architecture.


twice
noctilucent, I agree with this all starting with messiness. As metamechanic mentioned twice so far, proof takes time, and at least you took the time.


thinking
Scolari does say, however, some nice things about drawing/not drawing Calvino's Invisible Cities. It got me thinking that what I've been doing for more than half of the last 30 years is drawing/not drawing an invisible museum of architecture.


thinking
Coincidently read this in The Autopoiesis of Architecture early this morning:
"...and Rem Koolhaas's Delirious New York celebrating Manhattan's 'culture of congestion' and its 'critical paranoid method' of radical programmatic and stylistic juxtaposition. The phenomena that Koolhaas found in New York--congestion and random juxtaposition--were violating the prevailing Modernist principles." (p. 130)
It seems that "congestion and random juxtaposition--were violating the prevailing Modernist principles" could be said for Libeskind's collage as well.
Maybe later today I'll take the La Villette plan and cut-and-paste it like a Libeskind collage.
While thinking of all this, I was reminded of something I wrote 2004.05.18 (for sure subliminally influenced by Koolhaas): "I like the list; like chapters, like lessons, like evolutionary stages, like different floors of a building I'd love to design, like a row of restaurants while you're perpetually hungry."
And finally, like the La Villette plan is the section of the New York Athletic Club flipped down, that tower for Dubai is...


Acadia National Park Headquarters Building

Mausoleum of Constantina   Basilica of St. Agnes

Baths of Constantine

Ch‚teau de Chambord

Fortifications of Florence

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

Electronic Calculation Center Olivetti

House 10: Museum

Princeton Memorial Park Tower

Mausoleum of Constantina   Basilica of St. Agnes

Baths of Constantine

Ch‚teau de Chambord

Fortifications of Florence

Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts

Electronic Calculation Center Olivetti

House 10: Museum

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