Encyclopedia Ichnographica

Platner, Samuel Ball

1/1



Platner, Samuel Ball


Samuel Ball Platner, The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (Boston: Allyn and Bacon, 1904).

2502 2503 2504 2505 2506 2507 2509 2512 2514 2515 2517 2519 2531 2533 2534 2535 2536 2537 2538 2540 2546 2547 2548 2551 2553 2574 2576 2578 2579 2581 2591 2593 2594 2595 2606 2608 2611 2613 2622 2623 2625 2626 2627 2633 2634 2654 2664 2699 2702 2707 2714 2718 2721 2722 2723 2727 2728 2731 2737 2741 2748 2772 2777 2795 2796 2797 2798 2801 2802 2803 2816 2817 2834 283b 2839 2842 2843 2847 2849 2851 2852 2856 2857 2858 2859 2863 2864 2865 2867 2872 2874 2876 2882 2884 2885 2888 2889 2891 2892 2895 2897 2898 2916 2926 2965 2997 2999 3002 3023 3025 3027 3028 3030 3031 3032 3033 3036 3039 3041 3045 3047 3048 3049 3055 3060 3062 3065 3066 3067 3070 3071 3073 3078 3087 3089 3098

eros et thanatos
2683b 2683c
1999.01.29




research assisance
2655b
2002.10.26 13:55




research assisance
2655b
2002.10.27 13:50

It rocked Eisenman on his chair...
2007.11.11 17:08

"Equally, the Campo Marzio would not function as an urban entity. There are no streets as such; rather, the ground is filled with what can be called interstitial figures."
Peter Eisenman, "Notations of Affect. An Architecture of Memory" in Pathos, Affect, Gefühl (Berlin: Walter de Gruyter GmbH, 2004), pp.504-11.

"The level plain of the campus Martius was particularly well adapted to this characteristic form of Roman architecture--the porticus--which conformed to a general model, while varying in proportions and details. The porticus consisted of a covered colonnade, formed by two or more rows of columns, or a wall on one side and columns on the other. lts chief purpose was to provide a place for walking and lounging which should be sheltered from storm and sun, and for this reason the intercolumnar spaces were sometimes filled with glass or hedges of box. Within the porticoes or in apartments connected closely with them, were collections of statuary, paintings, and works of art of all kinds, as well as shops and bazaars. In some cases the porticus took its name from some famous statue or painting, as the porticus Argonautarum.

While the erection of the first porticus in the campus Martius dates from the early part of the second century B.C., the period of rapid development in their numbers and use did not begin until the Augustan era. The earliest of these structures seem to have been devoted exclusively to business purposes. By the time of the Antonines, there were upwards of a dozen in region IX, some of them of great size, and it was possible to walk from the forum of Trajan to the pons Aelius under a continuous shelter. They were usually magnificently decorated and embellished, and provided with beautiful gardens.
Samuel Ball Platner, The Topography and Monuments of Ancient Rome (1904).

Although written over 140 years after the Ichnographia Campus Martius, Platner's text nonetheless describes perfectly Piranesi's delineation, particulary between the forum of Trajan and the pons Aelius. Indeed, the porticus is the most abundant building type throughout the Ichnographia Campus Martius.



««««

»»»»

0311 2527e 2584 2589c 3236c 3307d 3728f
www.quondam.com/e28/2845.htm

Quondam © 2014.12.24